Breaking

Infographic: Five Things You Didn't Know About the Deaf Culture


Transcription for people with low vision or blindness:

THE UNITED NATIONS PROTECTS IT

Although it may seem strange to most people, there is a Deaf culture that is not associated with a disability but with Sign Language and the visual experience of the world. Article 30 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities recognizes the right of Deaf people to their cultural and linguistic identity.

IT IS CONSIDERED AS AN ETHNIC CULTURE

The Deaf culture meets all the criteria established by social scientists: collective name, norms and beliefs, values, knowledge, customs, social structure, language, arts, history, etc.

THEY USE CAPITAL LETERS IN ENGLISH

In English they differentiate between Deaf, with uppercase, for the recognition of Deaf culture, and deaf, with lowercase, for the pathology of deafness. It is possible that in other languages it is not used because, by its grammatical norms, it would be incorrect.

THE FAME OF THE SILENT APPLAUSE

The applause shaking hands in the air is one of the best-known gestures of Deaf culture. Its origin is uncertain, but it is believed that it could have arisen after a concert of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony in 1824. The audience, knowing about Beethoven's deafness, and unable to hear the applause, began to wave their hands in the air.

EVEN THE SENSE OF HUMOUR IS DIFFERENT

It has been proven that there are own jokes in the Deaf culture that are passed on from generation to generation of Deaf people who are only understood if the Sign Language and the cultural specificity of humour are known.

Sources:
  • Joes, M. (2002). Deafness as culture: A psychosocial perspective. Disability Studies Quarterly, 22(2).
  • Harrington, T. (2007). Visual applause: Where did it come from? In Gallaudet University Library.
  • Lane, H. (2005). Ethnicity, ethics, and the deaf-world. Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education, 10(3), 291-310.
  • United Nations (2006). Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Nueva York. https://www.un.org/development/desa/disabilities/convention-on-the-rights-of-persons-with-disabilities.html
  • Rutherford, S.D. (1983). Funny in Deaf. Not in Hearing. The Journal of American Folklore, 96(381), 310-322.
Powered by Blogger.