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Amazing Deaf Artists (II)

Second part of this series of three articles dedicated to Deaf artists of plastic arts.

    Parts: 1  |  2  |  3

Ellen Mansfield: Ceramist and Painter

Photo: ellenmansfield.com / ikouii.com

Ellen was born deaf in 1960, in Manhattan (United States), and all her life she has experimented with many different forms of artistic expression: drawing, painting, ceramics, batik (a Javanese style textile printing technique), etc. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree with a specialization in illustration from the School of Visual Arts New York City, one of the leading art universities in the United States. After that, Ellen became aware of how her deaf identity had been part of her artwork, and since then, deaf culture has been part of her work.

For her ceramics, she uses a kiln in her home studio for firing both low and high fire tiles. She works in a variety of aesthetic and technical styles including sculpted relief, carved plaster blocks, tile presses and mosaic tiles. In addition, Ellen is an advocate for the right to Sign Language, giving lectures on audism, which she experienced as a child, or art workshops for Deaf children.


You can follow Ellen Mansfield on any of her social media:

Jean-Michel Rol: Sign Language Painter

Jean-Michel Rol on the right (photo: laterredargence.fr)

Jean-Michel considers himself an "activist painter" and wants to spread Sign Language in society by expressing it through his paintings. This French painter became deaf at 14 months due to meningitis and considers that "to be Deaf is to be able to communicate in Sign Language".


His artworks always area about Sign Language and often express personal experiences from his childhood, such as being hit on the fingers by his teacher because he was expressing himself in Sign Language instead of speaking orally.

Pedro Quiñoá: Painter of Paintings and Cabezudos

Pedro Quiñoá (photo: El Progreso)

You could say that Peter is a painter who has reinvented himself. As a child he liked to draw Disney characters and his family introduced him to painting lessons at the age of 11. However, since his teacher did not know sign language, clumsily all he could do was request him to copy other artworks. Disenchanted, he gradually abandoned painting until, in his thirties, he recovered his artistic passion as a hobby.

Now he combines painting with work and family, painting whenever he has time. His works tend to surrealism with a lot of color. In addition, every year he paints the cabezudos (carnival figure with oversized head) for the local festivities, something that he also loves.



You can follow Pedro Quiñoá on any of his social media:

Awet Moges: Graphic Novelist

Awet Moges (photo: Gebaerden Welt TV)

Awet considers himself a "simple Eritrean boy" who was lucky enough to be born into a family that, concerned about his education, emigrated to the United States. He is now a graphic novelist who has succeeded in publishing his first works with remarkable success, the Pantheon series, of which he has now completed three volumes.

His artwork is influenced by great artists like Frank Herbert and John Byrne, although he found his own style of drawing. In order to develop his graphic novels, he extensively documented in science fiction books.


You can follow Awet Moges on any of his social media:

Cilla: Portrait Photographer

Cilla (foto: Cilla's Facebook page)

Cilla is an American portrait photographer who fell in love with photography when her aunt gave her her first camera. She believes that her greatest struggle as a professional photographer is the discrimination she sometimes suffers as a person of colour.


You can follow Cilla on any of her social media:

Jon Savage: Pop Artist

John Savage (image: jonsavagegallery.com)

John Savage has been passionate about all types of visual arts since his childhood, having experienced photography, video editing, film directing, acting and painting. However, in the last decade he has focused more on painting and pop photography based on people and classic themes that inspire him using abstract and bright colors.

In his pop artworks he uses a technique that mixes photography, computer photo editing and painting, taking him between three days and a month of work to complete them, almost always with one element in common: horizontal lines. In the following video you can see his work process.


You can follow John Savage on any of his social media:
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